Tag Archives: side effects of cancer treatment

The anxiety

It’s Tuesday. Although my mucositis is much improved I still have sores in my mouth and esophagus–almost five weeks after my last infusion.

I am scheduled for my fifth infusion on Thursday. However Dr. Lin called me this morning and it pushing it back another week–fortunately the trial allows for up to a four week delay.

Do I go for one more? Maybe even two? Wait until my next scan to decide?

Damn this is difficult.

My mood is so very improved and I suspect there is a direct relationship between positivity/motivation and feeling better. I am decidedly anxious that if I get another infusion, it will not only be my mouth that starts hurting again.

So I don’t know. My higher morale has also been correlative with a greater desire to survive. And the difficulty with clinical trials as they currently exist is that as a participant I am given very little latitude. Should I drop out there is no returning.

Chances are I’m going with infusion, simply because it places me in a position of greater options. But psychologically, this is a tough one.

I’m so very relieved that I have another week to think and hopefully heal.

And some piece of mind

I have scans again one week from today. Two days later I am to review them and to have another infusion. I already know that my new oncologist will not be able to meet with me that day—I believe she shall be in the ICU. Younger doctors are being asked to fill all sorts of roles now—previously she was on the COVID19 unit. I am sure they are receiving a phenomenal education but the stress must be extraordinary. And of course, it is hard for their cancer patients as well.

Given the gravity of my decision (yes) I decided that it was best to get in touch with Alice. Yesterday I sent her this message:

“Good morning. Scans a week from Tuesday and I won’t actually be seeing Jess so thought I’d discuss with you. I have been pretty flipping miserable for weeks now—physically and emotionally. Last night my mouth/throat/tongue were the worst yet. Unless those scans show some very compelling reason as to why to stay on this I am done. Done to the point that even if there is not a good next choice done. If I have six months to live I’d rather not be miserable. If there is a good chance the MEK inhibitor will have similar side effects than it is not the drug for me. Honestly I have been so depressed that at times I have been ready to call it quits all together. However, given the possibility of improvement while retaining quality of life, I could rally. So let’s discuss what that might or might not look like.

She responded immediately and then called me later. This next scan shall be telling but my mind is made up per suffering—if it is for naught, I am not on board.

Today was better—the discomfort remains great but knowing that I have drawn a line in the sand I feel safer somehow. Just as it is powerful to know one’s strengths it is also imperative to appreciate one’s limits.

I love life. So very much. But pain is incredibly demoralizing and I have made the choice that for me, not how I wish to spend the rest of my time here.

Fingers crossed that there is an easier option.

Taking a breather from being brave

The last few days have been tough. I’ve now got ulcers all throughout my mouth and down my esophagus. My sinuses and ear canals hurt as well and it is my guess that anywhere I have a mucous membrane has been affected.

This has impacted both my appetite and my ability to eat. Basically I am getting down whatever I am able to and a case of powdered ensure arrived on my doorstep yesterday.

I had been told that hair loss was a possibility and three days ago it started coming out in handfuls. I’m rocking the plucked chicken look now and my follicles are all hyper sensitive. This afternoon Diane is taking me to a friend of hers for a buzz cut—somehow more dignified than heading to Super Cuts.

My usual joie de vivre and can do spirit has taken a (temporary) hit as well. I’ve spent a lot of time on the couch doing nothing, just literally riding this wave until it’s over; the wave being depression.

Even warriors have their down days–this shit gets old. On Thursday I will have my second infusion and have to hope that by pre-dosing with steroids and Benadryl we are able to avoid an infusion reaction. My team will be on high alert with epipens at the ready.

In the meantime I am trying both to be gentle with myself but also to push forward. Nobody said this would be easy. I just didn’t think it would be this hard.

But…(because I do like to end on a positive note) my breathing really is better. That is a wonderful thing and (if I believe my own pep talks) worth wading through. I can do this.

I can. And I will.

What can be lived with and what cannot

I’m not gonna lie. Mucositis might be the most unpleasant side effect I have dealt with yet. Currently I have an ulcer on the side of my tongue, on both inner cheeks, and covering the back of my throat and trailing down my esophagus. Excess mucous that causes me to gag and choke is part of this not so pretty picture.

Sucks and certainly has a negative impact on quality of life. However, and this is a big however, my breathing has improved. Markedly.

I can’t live if I can’t breathe. These side effects blow but there aren’t going to kill me.

So there you go. The things we do to stay alive. And I have already noted that I am willing to do just about anything to stay at this party.

Even the stuff that’s hard to swallow. Pun intended.

xo

Losing it

Earlier this week I made my morning cup of coffee immediately upon rising, just as I always do. But then I couldn’t find it. Anywhere. And I live in a one room loft. I also left my eyeglasses at a local restaurant over the weekend and as their staff’s search turned up nothing, I’m going to have to buy a new pair. Yesterday I misplaced the bra I was planning on wearing. I later found it in a bowl of oranges. Don’t ask, as I couldn’t answer, because I simply do not know.

Sometimes it’s funny, other times it’s frustrating as hell.

All these years of clinical trials and continuous treatment are catching up to me. Add in menopause and advancing age as well as the fact that I live alone, in itself a rather extraordinary thing for a person dealing with a terminal illness.

Yet there is an upside. I am now convinced that children have incredibly short attention spans by design (so to speak). That if they were able to mull, ponder and plan the way adults do, they might well waste the precious time allotted to childhood. There is a magnificent advantage to a wandering perspective–so incredibly well suited to experiencing the world with eyes wide open and without bias.

With my limited ability to recall, I am rather like a child. Everything feels fresh and seemingly brand new. My focus is short, but also incredibly intense. At times it as if I am tripping, my senses tickled by any stimulus at all. As an artist, this is a boon. Emotionally, it can also be of enormous benefit, as I am no longer prone to extensive rumination; once upon a time, losing my (beautiful and expensive) blue eyeglasses would have undone me, at least for a time. I regret their loss, but in the same way a child mourns a broken toy–briefly.

It is only when I need to function as an adult; someone with responsibilities and hard deadlines, that this lack of linear concentration becomes a true liability. I would in fact consider it almost a disability, although one that is neither obvious nor fully understood by those around me. I believe that might be because my cognitive challenges don’t reflect diminished intellect but rather the increasing inability to retain, recollect and organize information.

I could use some help–some sort of cheery task master. Someone who would commit to a couple of hours each week to assist me with those chores I now find so daunting (paying bills, taxes, getting my vintage clothing business up and running, managing my finances).

I already devote well over a third of my income to health care and I think a personal assistant is likely a luxury above my means. However, I would like to propose that there should be some sort of federal agency (yes, I’m dreaming) akin to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs for clinical trial participants. That there be recognition (on the federal level) that in the war on cancer, clinical trial participants are serving on the front line. And that we, like veterans of other wars, deserve some sort of special consideration of both what has been given but also taken. Financially, emotionally, physically.

I’m committed to continuing to fight the good fight–and I do so gladly. With or without assistance. However, if anybody out there with mad organizational skills and a little spare time wants to come hang out, coffee’s included.

*if I can find it 🙂