Tag Archives: binimetinib

Action plan

I had an oncology appointment in Boston today and met one of the new members of my team. Alice will remain my oncologist, but her role will necessarily be more limited than before. I told this new doctor that I felt my cancer was now in my right lung as well–I can both feel and hear it (wheezing/crackling). She took a listen with the stethoscope and confirmed.

So those horses are not only out of the barn–they are moving to another pasture.

Obviously that’s not a good thing. It’s a damn shame that lungs are an essential organ, but it is what it is. And what it is, is that it’s getting harder to breathe.

Time to spring into action. Given the fact that I have some upcoming big plans (a panel at Takeda, my TED talk, birthday, Thanksgiving) we are holding off until December. Scans on the 2nd, first infusion on the 5th.

Originally the plan was to add carboplatin and avastin to lorlatinib. However I have already had four rounds of carbo as well as four rounds of cisplatin. A lot of platinum for one girl. My peripheral neuropathy is rather severe, particularly in my feet. On various occasions I have walked around unaware that I had cardboard liners, stones, or wet socks in my shoes. The bottom of my feet are almost totally numb, and although I have adapted to this unsettling scenario (only an occasional stumble) we certainly don’t want it to get worse.

So Alice felt carbo was not the best bet, and that perhaps we should go with pemetrexed instead. We were going to add avastin, in the hope of hitting the cancer with a bigger hammer. However, I have been coughing up some blood and also have had small abrasions become larger wounds that were loathe to heal–both indicators that I might be at greater risk for bleeding in my lungs secondary to avastin.

There is a distinct possibility (and a big, big hope) that chemotherapy will have a synergistic effect with both lorlatinib and binimetinib–the drug I would receive in conjunction with lorlatinib in the next clinical trial I shall enroll in. Given that, I want to make certain our approach is not tepid. As avastin has been ruled out, I asked that carbo be added back in–but at a lower dose. If I tolerate the first round, we will continue. If not, then it will simply be pemetrexed.

I had a vitamin B12 shot today and will begin taking folic acid in preparation for infusion. I am ready but also understandably leery. This will be the first time that I have undergone chemo while living alone. That in itself should be a bit of an adventure. However, I think I know what to expect.

And I am ready to launch an attack.

Branching out

So. The goddess came through.

First we reviewed my scans and discussed the findings:

Sub-solid mass like opacities in the left upper lobe have increased in size and attenuation since the prior study as described.

Persistent and slightly increased groundglass and interlobular septal thickening in the basilar left lung, suggestive of lymphangitic carcinomatosis. 

Additional sub solid nodules in the left lung are stable or slightly increased in size compared with the prior exam. 

Slightly increased small loculated left pleural effusion.

No surprises there and I am grateful that the word slightly predominates. It is clear where this trend is going but it would also seem that we have time to figure out what the best approach shall be.

First, I am to start nebulizing in an attempt to address my bronchorrhea–the source of the persistent crackle in my left lung. And should it get worse, there is the option of combining pemetrexed with lorlatinib–which would mean leaving the trial and getting lorlatinib by prescription. Avastin could be added to the mix for possibly greater efficacy. Alice is going to start the ball rolling in that direction so that I can apply for financial assistance to help pay for the deductible on lorlatinib–just in case. However pemetrexed kicked my butt energy wise when I was on it seven years ago, so this course will only be as needed.

Most exciting is the news that Alice is going to be opening her own trial at MGH in a couple of months–combining lorlatinib with a MEK inhibitor–binimetinib. She feels this is something that could be effective in my case, so it is my first choice.

Also encouraging is what has been going on behind the scenes in Alice’s lab. My last biopsy identified three secondary acquired mutations. One, G1202R, I had previously and lorlatinib is likely at least somewhat effective against that yet. The other two are newly acquired: S1206F and G1269A. S1206F is rare; Alice has not seen it in any of her other patients. However G1269A is becoming a more common mechanism of resistance to ALK inhibition, along with G1202R.

Alice then shared with me that they have been attempting to make models of all the possible combinations of my three mutations, so as to test drug against them.


I tell you what. This is not the Cadillac of health care, it is the Bugatti La Voiture Noire. It is incredibly humbling to understand the astounding degree of highly personalized effort being expended in the interest of saving my ass. So I damn well better show up.

Yes. That branch just got a little bit thicker–it might even be sprouting some new growth. Alice’s parting words to me were ‘If anyone can do this, you can Linnea.’ To which I responded, ‘If anyone can do this, we can, Alice.’

xo