Category Archives: ALK mutations

And they call this coverage

$8.80 a puff

Boys and girls, the price you see on the package of Advair (thirty day supply) is my frigging copay. Well, it would be if I’d actually taken that little inhaler home with me.

Yep. I’ve got health insurance again, as mandated by the laws of my country. Coverage that is designed for people like me who are lower income. Coverage that barely covers anything.

First, there is the fact that I had to get this insurance two months before the end of the next enrollment period. I had already met my deductible with my last policy but now I’m back to ground zero and unlike my previous policy, this one aims to meet said deductible in one fell swoop.

And….I can’t. I simply do not have the money to pay $528.11 for an inhaler that will last me thirty days.

I’d been hoping against hope that my health would hold until the end of this calendar year so that I could avoid the necessity of maxing out my deductible. Not. I just had scans and a month from today I am scheduled for a needle biopsy, a surgical procedure. Historically, every single needle biopsy I have had has resulted in a partial pneumothorax or collapsed lung. And that means an overnight in the big house; aka the hospital.

So I guess there is no avoiding hitting that deductible in every category. And then it will be January and I’ll start all over again. Hopefully the tires on my car will hold, because income taxes come due in April.

I’ve said this before but in case you did not hear me, I will say it again. It is not tenable.

This is health care in America when you are caught between poverty and prosperity. My income qualifies me as lower middle class and yet, with a chronic illness, far too much of that income goes toward medical costs.

The stress is unrelenting. And, unlike veterans of other wars, there is no agency to make certain that in recognition of my service as a clinical trial participant my medical needs are met.

It’s crazy. All of it. Lousy health insurance. $528.11 copays. And the fact that Pfizer is now poised to make beaucoup bucks off of the experimental therapeutic that I, one of the first trial participants to ever take lorlatinib, (three people in each cohort–does escalation phase–I was in the third) helped bring to fruition. And here I am, unable to pay for an inhaler.

Really kinda blows, doesn’t it.

An ill wind

I have health insurance again, as of five days ago. Trial back on track with scans last week and labs and a review tomorrow.

However, my relief at regaining coverage is tempered by some unaccustomed anxiety.

For more than a month now my upper lobe—all that remains on the left side—has been making a crackling noise when I exhale. I know this noise and there’s nothing good about it. In addition, I have experienced an occasional cough and some shortness of breath as well as some streaking of blood in my sputum.

Best case scenario, this is an infection. But the fact that two rounds of antibiotics have not knocked it down is not encouraging.

This wouldn’t be my first time at the rodeo but damn, I’ve gotten nicely accustomed to an easier ride. Of note, lorlatinib was just granted FDA approval. This is the third time I’ve been in a first in human trial where the experimental therapeutic has gotten approved for prescribed use. A good feeling, that.

And now for a stable scan.

So this is pretty fabulous

I want to share something wonderful with you. As a member of the ALKPositive group, I offered to start an Instagram page where photos and stories of ALK+ patients could be shared. I knew it would be special but I had no idea how special. Nor did I realize how moved I would feel as I transcribed these individual stories of suffering but also formidable grace and courage. So many beautiful faces. Almost all of them stage IV. Far too many of them young, including a number of women who were diagnosed either while pregnant or just after giving birth.

But what shines through the most? Love. Lots and lots of love. Please go to Instagram and check it out at alkpositiveworldwide. Follow us. If you are ALK+ (or if you have lost someone who was–this is intended to function as a memorial as well) and you’d like to be part of the wall, submit a photo to me as well the following information: Date of diagnosis, stage and age. And a brief statement about living with ALK+ lung cancer.

This is our opportunity to show the world the faces of lung cancer. Brave, beautiful, loving, living, finding ways to cope and always, always hoping.

Words matter and this one’s gotta go

Screen Shot 2018-06-04 at 5.38.14 PM

Yesterday was National Cancer Survivors Day, and I just went meh. Wait–make that hell no.

I don’t ‘do’ Survivors Day. My lack of enthusiasm is manifold. First of all, cancer is not a damned day. For many of us, there is no life ‘after’ cancer. Nope. As I’ve said before; been there, doing it. This is present tense.

And then there is the word survivor. I loathe it. Survivor is too much, too little, too late. If you haven’t stopped to read the definition of survivor lately, let me refresh your memory:

Screen Shot 2018-06-04 at 5.58.20 PM

Yuck. Who wants to be the ‘person remaining alive after an event in which others have died.’ Or the ‘remainder’. I suppose someone who ‘copes well’ is a good thing but then again, a rather serious understatement when you are talking about cancer.

The word ‘survivor’ is inadequate. It is also implicitly negative/ugly. No one wants to be ‘the sole survivor of a massacre’–we want everyone to survive. Ever wonder where survivor guilt comes from? Look no further.

In the past I have referred to myself as ‘surviving cancer’. The verb vs noun thing seemed to better capture the fact that I am now and likely always will be in treatment.

However, after thirteen years of surviving, I’m sick of this shit.

From now on, I reject both verb and noun in favor of a far more positive/forward thinking term. I am living with lung cancer.

And you know what? There is no guilt associated with being alive. If you’re not already there, join me.

xo

 

For all you tough mothers out there

Check out that slogan 🙂

Happy Day; this one’s ours.

Like all holidays, it feels a bit bittersweet. A reminder of good times but also bad.

Four years ago I took my first dose of lorlatinib (image from that momentous occasion shown above). Several days later I started coughing up specks of blood. By the morning of day six, my hemoptysis was significant enough that Dr. Shaw asked me to come to MGH for an emergency CT scan just to rule out a pulmonary embolism.

As I was getting ready to go to the hospital, a call came in from Utah, where my mother and stepfather lived. It wasn’t yet daybreak there so I knew something must be wrong. My stepfather was on the other end of the line and he began to cry as he told me that my mother, Evalynn, had passed away in the night.

Mom, gone.

I fought back tears and panic both as I drove the hour into Boston. My daughter met me at the hospital and when the tech emerged post scan I jokingly asked ‘so is my cancer all gone?’ No, but almost. And the blood? Likely a result of rapid tumor necrosis.

And then my heart broke because the person I wanted to call first was no longer here.

However, grief was side by side with joy: I was going to have more time to spend with my three children; Jemesii, August and Peter. Being a mom is the one thing that keeps me going no matter what—my raison d’être.

In three weeks one of my (now adult) children will be moving back in with me. The reality is, he still needs his mother. And I am absolutely thrilled that I have the privilege of being here. For him. For me. For life.

O yeah

So I suppose I’d be remiss not to mention that Alice (Dr. Shaw) and Linnea (moi) are featured in an article in the March 2018 issue of O, The Oprah Magazine.

It’s a solid to have the subject of lung cancer receiving notice in a major publication such as O, so thank you Ms. Winfrey 🙂

And for those of you without access to the print magazine, O has put the article up online as well: Thanks to New Science, Lung Cancer Patients Are Living Longer Than Ever.

I’d also like to express my gratitude to the author of the article, Leslie Goldman.

The pass it on power of media

Those of us who are ALK+ (alkies) have a Facebook group (ALK-I.E.S. Worldwide–it is a closed group–limited to those who are ALK+, message the moderator for permission to join) started by Tom Carroll and his wife Merita (Merita is the patient/mutant). This group operates as both a forum and a source of support, and has a growing membership of ALK+ patients and their caregivers which is worldwide.

Earlier today one of the members asked for the link to a story I appeared in some eight years ago, on June 2, 2009. They were inquiring as they’d been introduced to Bill Schuette, another ALK+ patient, and he had referenced this particular news story while talking about his own cancer journey.

I found the link, which was kind of fun as I had not watched it in years. More fun still, in the ensuing online conversation we learned that Bill provided essential information to another alkie, Catherine, who in turn helped Jeff, also ALK+. Bill himself joined our conversation and provided a link to a video he made at MGH. Watched in conjunction, our two videos are such a splendid example of how media has the (exponential) potential to help someone else. And social media serves the same purpose–as we make connections and share information and resources.

Linnea and Bill. Connected 🙂