Feeling sentimental

I was born at the tail end of 1959. My childhood, though flawed by my birth parent’s unhappy union and therefore our dysfunctional family, now feels incredibly quaint.

Once upon a time I might have used that word–quaint–with derision. But now, in a world I hardly recognize, it is with all due respect.

It was so much simpler. Five channels, two catalogs (Sears and Montgomery Wards). Keds or Buster Browns.

Once a year, The Wizard of Oz (my favorite movie then and now) would air. Sunday mornings we’d fight over who got to read the comics first. Sunday evenings were devoted to The Magical World of Disney.

Of course, there was a fair amount of discomfort. First, the fact that I was a girl and therefore a second class citizen, something I figured out rather quickly. And as a left hander, it was immediately clear that school (desks, cursive and scissors) had not been designed with me in mind. And then there was winter. Our woolen snow pants and rubber boots, which we lined with plastic bread bags so that our feet slid in more easily.

I do not begrudge progress or the future. In fact, I feel that at heart I am much more a millennial than a boomer. And I am also an optimist to my core–even if life is a shit show (and I think it’s fair to say it is), I wanna be there.

Right to the bitter end.

However, I am grateful that I have memories of a less complicated moment in history. When nothing was on demand. Gasoline smelled good (pre ethanol) as did the pungent smell of a red paper cap–from a cap gun–hit by a hammer. Vacant lots and forts and banana seat bikes.

It was glorious–in large part because of my myopia. My inability not only to see how difficult life was for some, but also how challenging adulthood would prove to be for me.

An imperfect childhood. And yet–because it was my one and only youth–precious.

xo

4 responses to “Feeling sentimental

  1. Oh thanks for reviving these memories.

    On Mon, Sep 28, 2020 at 9:45 PM life and breath: outliving lung cancer wrote:

    > > > > > > > linnea11 posted: ” > I was born at the tail end of 1959. My childhood, though flawed by my > birth parent’s unhappy union and therefore our dysfunctional family, now > feels incredibly quaint. > > > > Once upon a time I might have used that word–quaint–with derision. But > now, in a ” > > > >

  2. Linnea,
    So well said. Thank you for sending me down “memory lane”. It’s where I need to be tonight & maybe for a few days. Thank you with love, Katie

  3. As I read this I was instantly back in my childhood neighborhood, with that smell of caps, the Good humor man, toasted almond pops, bike riding forever. Yes, far more uncomplicated when you’d get upset losing your favorite pink “Spaldeen” (Spaulding) and play Yoyo’s out back by the garages.

  4. The same. Just to not think about things as a kid. Almost idyllic. I read all your posts having met you at the 100 event years ago. And I appreciate them all. Especially so in this shitshow of a year. xxo Chris Lañe

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s