Drop in NSCLC mortality

So that’s a good thing, right?

Well of course it is. However, let’s discuss.

Statistics show that those of us with non small cell lung cancer are living longer. This is attributed in large part to targeted therapies.

I can’t argue with any of that. I expected to die more than a decade ago, but thanks to TKI’s, I’m still here. And fully fucking grateful at my good fortune.

But let’s not fool ourselves. Living longer is a consolation prize.

Yup. It is not even in the same ball park as assuming you will reach old age. Those of us surviving lung cancer are doing it day by day, month by month, and year by year.

Not only does it take courage, it requires an extraordinary amount of grace to be grateful for the short end of the stick. And from time to time I feel compelled to remind others of this fact.

What most can take for granted, those of us living with terminal illnesses hold dear. It’s the difference between being lost in the desert with a full canteen of water and one that is almost empty.

We cannot afford to be wasteful, and yet that impulse to take a big gulp is still there. So yes, grace and self control.

And the ability to savor. Every last drop.

xo

4 responses to “Drop in NSCLC mortality

  1. On Thu, Aug 13, 2020 at 4:24 PM life and breath: outliving lung cancer wrote:

    > > May I share this on FB? So good. > > > > > linnea11 posted: ” > So that’s a good thing, right? > > > > Well of course it is. However, let’s discuss. > > > > Statistics show that those of us with non small cell lung cancer are > living longer. This is attributed in large part to targeted therapies. > > > > I can’t argue with any of th” > > > >

  2. Thank you for this– “Not only does it take courage, it requires an extraordinary amount of grace to be grateful for the short end of the stick.” Those are the words I’ve been looking for to express how I have sometimes felt in my five year journey living with stage IV LC. I have often felt like I cannot complain about anything, ever, as long as my scans hold stable. If I do slip and whine about something that I may have whined about before diagnosis, people are quick to remind me how I should just be grateful to be alive. Believe me, I am. Sometimes I want to scream at them, “yes, I am so very grateful to be alive, but does that mean I am not allowed to ever express negativity, frustration or displeasure–like a normal person?” Or just shut up and swallow every shit sandwich that comes my way (and as you know with this disease, they just keep coming) with a smile, because, hey, I’m alive, so therefore I should be content with whatever life dishes out. I have made great strides in not sweating the small stuff (major type A personality), but still sometimes the short end of the stick just just makes me mad as hell and I don’t want to have to feel ungrateful in expressing those feelings. Sorry for the rant, just wanted to let you know that I am going to steal your phrase and commit it to memory, write it down where I can see it daily, and try my best to embrace the short end of the stick as gracefully as possible. Thank you Linnea, now I know I am not alone!

  3. 💖 ten years for me this November as well. Following a left lower lobectomy and wedge section to left upper. I have followed you ever since. I thank you for all that you give us! The good. The bad. The ugly. Good to know what we’re dealing with 💞

  4. Excellent post. Kim

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